Hola Barcelona

The great thing about being a Languages Student on a Year Abroad is that all of my coursemates are also abroad dotted around the globe, mostly Europe, which gives me an excellent excuse visit them wherever they have managed to end up this year, many only a train ride away!

This week was Toussaint (Half Term/Reading Week in France), and so we had a week off from university – it was the perfect opportunity to do some travelling.

Barcelona was at the top of my list for places to visit when I arrived in Perpignan, being only an hour and a half away by train, and last weekend I finally got to tick it off my list! It is a beautiful city but it was an especially great weekend because I also got to spend it with Jenny and Nathan, coursemates from Sheffield who are currently teaching English at schools not far from Alicante. We are all living in the region of Catalonia, but what was a short hour and a half journey for me, was a five hour journey for them..!

I love Spain, there is just something about this country that always get me – which is reassuring as I am moving to Salamanca in February! I do find it more challenging to express myself in Spanish than French, but I have been studying French for 12 years and Spanish for only 3, so I try not to knock myself down too much because of it. I’m sure a few months living in Spain will sort me out.

Kam and I originally intended to take a covoiturage to Barcelona, but the driver cancelled the day before, so we had to get a last-minute train that cost more than if we had booked in advance. Oh well. We all arrived early afternoon into Barcelona Sants station, navigated the metro to our hostel, which is not far from Urquenaona.

We set off for our first stop: Parc Güell, which we had prepaid tickets for. After a lot of hill-climbing we managed to get to where we needed to be. The Parc Güell is a masterpiece, although it is a shame we had to pay (7€ for students) to get into the Monumental Presinct, as apparently it was free not long ago. It does prevent overcrowding but there were still a lot of people. Nevertheless, it is an architectural symbol of Barcelona and there are fantastic views of the city which make it a must-see.

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Parc Güell

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Parc Güell

After a quick return to the hostel, and a bad experience a Chinese restaurant nearby, we made our way to the Font Màgica de Montjuïc (Magical Fountain), outside the Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya. However, we only arrived for the last ten minutes of the light show before it ended at 11:30pm, but it was still spectacular. We sat on the steps at the top of the hill for a while and just looked out in the distance at Barcelona at night. It was definately a highlight of the weekend.

Font màgica de Montjuïc

Font màgica de Montjuïc

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Night view from the Museu Nacional d’Art de Catalunya

 Saturday morning we walked around the Barri gotic before Kam had to get her flight back home for the week. We went to the cathedral and took the lift up to the roof to see the view (cost 3€)

Kam, me, Nathan and jenny outside the cathedral

Kam, me, Nathan and jenny outside the cathedral

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Me, Nathan and Kam!

Me, Nathan and Kam!

I’ll take this as an opportunity to mention that Barcelona is a very expensive city in which to be a tourist – I was expecting to spend a lot of money, but not as much as I did!

However, after a slightly disasterous evening meal the previous evening, we went to a tapas bar which Nathan and Jenny had been before which was so good. Tapas ranged from 1-3€ (i.e. well-priced!) and there was Crème catalane! I will definately be returning for my next trip to Barcelona in two weeks!

Tapas

Tapas

Crème catalane

Crème catalane

After our successful meal, we visited the Castell de Montjuïc which Nathan and Jenny recommended from their last trip to Barcelona, which was a bit of a pain to get to. We had to get the metro and then a funicular (which was out of service, so we had a replacement bus), then we could have either walked all the way up the hill (which was quite a walk!) or get a cable-car (7€ one-way – very pricey, but my feet were already dying). When we arrived, we learnt we also had to pay 5€ for entry-fee (no student tariff available), however the last time they came it was free, so this was a bit annoying.

The castle was interesting, we got a free information booklet in Spanish about the history of the castle, and there are some fantastic views of the sea from there, but I wouldn’t recommend going for how much it costs. There were so many Portuguese people there as well, so Nathan and I got to practise a bit of Portuguese. One Portuguese couple was a bit demanding, they wanted Nathan to take photos of them, but they were very into photography and had a complex camera and were very precise with how they wanted him to take the shot – this was all in Portuguese as well – it was good practise but a bit crazy! 

Duck faces

Duck faces

Toussaint14 037We walked all the way back down which was quite a pretty walk but my feet were very sore by this point. We had a walk to Poble sec, a metro station, which is apparently significant to recent a Spanish song, but I had no clue!

That evening we took a detour to see the outside of La Casa Batlló which I was wanting to see (one of Gaudi’s masterpieces). It was so beautiful lit up at night. I would love to visit it and go inside, but it is a hefty 18€50 for a student ticket – how is that even allowed??!

Casa Batlló

La Casa Batlló

We then went to 100 Montaditos, a type of fast-food chain restaurant in Spain. We went there in Valencia during La Sociedad Hispánica trip in April 2014, but I was so ill at the time, so I wasn’t able to actually eat anything. Barcelona was much better experience as I was well and could enjoy it. The quality of the food isn’t anything to brag about but it’s a cheap and lovely place. Tinto de verano was drunk and we didn’t end up eating until 11:30pm – gone are the days when I ate dinner at 4:30pm in Sheffield..!

Sunday morning, we had booked online tickets to visit the Sagrada Familia which allowed us to skip the massive queue. Also expensive (14€), yet worth it (like everything else it seems!). I especially loved the stained-glass windows and the light reflecting from them. It’s incredible how they haven’t even completed 60% of the work that needs to be done it – it is estimated it won’t be finished until at least 2030 as well! So much attention to detail, you could spend hours staring at everything around you and taking it all in.

Sagrada Familia

Sagrada Familia

Sagrada Familia

Sagrada Familia

Sagrada Familia

Sagrada Familia

Sagrada Familia

Sagrada Familia

After lunch and a quick visit to the Barceloneta beach, we rushed back to the hostel and ran across Barcelona to catch our trains at 5pm at last minute. After so a much rushed goodbye to take our seperate ways – Nathan and Jenny’s 5 hour journey back to Elda and my 5-hour train to Aix-en-Provence for my next trip, we all ended up having serious delays of over two hours and we didn’t get to where we needed to go until after midnight! Train journey from hell, yet I managed read 300 pages of Le Comte de Monte-Cristo…

So, my first visit to Barcelona was a success and it was so nice to see friendly familiar faces from home. It is such an expensive city but it is beautiful, which makes up for it’s price-tag. Luckily, I don’t have to wait too long to go back, as I am going there again in two weeks to see my boyfriend James, who I haven’t seen in 3 months since before going to Israel!

Muchas gracias/moltes gràcies to Nathan and Jenny for showing me around Barcelona 🙂 Next Spanish adventure: Madrid!

Next post will be on my visit to Provence! Aix-en-Provence, Marseille and Avignon.

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Avez-vous une ‘bourse’? (en français)

(En français. Introduction en anglais)

This is my second post for my Journal de bord, my first one can be found here. This is part of my Year Abroad assessment for The University of Sheffield; I must write four online diaries in French this semester, highlighting key moments, language learning and news/events in the region. I hope French-speakers enjoy it. This was written on 07/10/14 and focuses on events I did before I went to Nîmes, 10-12th October.

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Je n’arrive pas à comprendre que c’est déjà le mois d’octobre. Ma famille et mes amis en Angleterre se plaignent de la façon dont il fait si froid. Ici, il paraît comme il est toujours l’été parce que la température peut atteindre 30 degrés à midi – c’est assez drôle parce que les lumières de Noël sont déjà visibles dans les rues. C’est comme un été prolongée, mais j’ai maîtrisé enfin l’art de porter un jean dans des conditions très chaudes – quelque chose qui était presque impossible lorsque je suis arrivée en août. Le froid me manque quelque fois mais ce qui m’inquiète le plus, c’est que j’espère que je n’aie pas emballé tous mes écharpes, pulls et chapeaux ici pour rien! En tout cas, le froid me frappera quand je rentrerai à la maison pour Noël!

Comme je l’ai dit la dernière fois, le samedi dernier je suis allée à la ‘Journée d’accueil pour les Nouveaux Catalans ’ : un festival à Perpignan au Palais des rois de Majorque (un site historique en ville). Le but était de promouvoir les P.O. (Pyrénées-Orientales) et des entreprises et services dans la région. On a dû se lever tôt le matin pour y arriver à 10h. On ne savait pas ce que nous attendait, soit ce serait une bonne idée ou non, mais j’ai passé une super journée (très chargée) et je suis contente d’y avoir participé.

Quand on est arrivée, on s’est inscrite pour faire une excursion l’après-midi au Prieuré de Serrabonne. L’excursion était complètement gratuite : le transport aller-retour en bus et l’entrée au Prieuré. Avant notre visite au Prieuré de Serrabonne, on a pu explorer un peu le Palais des rois de Majorque. Le palais dispose sa propre chapelle qui est très petite mais élaborée. J’ai adoré la façon dont la lumière des vitraux reflétait sur les murs.

Le Palais des rois de Majorque

Le Palais des rois de Majorque

A few of the exhibit tents in the Palais des rois de Majorque gardens

Le Prieuré de Serrabonne est un site touristique et 1h15 en voiture de Perpignan dans les montagnes. C’est bien connu dans les P.O., pourtant c’est presque impossible d’accéder sans voiture parce qu’il n’y a pas de bus qui va par-là. C’était formidable que ce festival ait offert cette excursion, car je doutais pouvoir y visiter d’autre manière.
Le Prieuré, fondé au début du XI siècle, est tout petit et il n’est que un bâtiment très simple, mais il y a plusieurs qualités qui le fait un endroit que l’on doit visiter: le cloitre, la tribune et le beau paysage sauvage autour du Prieuré. Le Prieuré est surtout connu pour sa magnifique tribune en marbre, qui semble si étrange dans son bâtiment austère. À mon avis, la pièce la plus belle est le cloitre ; ses arcades, ornées de trois colonnes, ouvrent sur le ravin qui est à proximité du prieuré. C’est tellement beau, et lorsque l’on arrive au prieuré, on n’attend pas à trouver ce cloitre à l’intérieur, c’est comme un trésor caché. Le Prieuré est loin de civilisation et on peut bien apprécier la nature et la tranquillité des montagnes dans ses alentours.

Just look at this view!!!  La Prieuré de Serrabonne

Le paysage!!! Le Prieuré de Serrabonne

Bien que Perpignan se trouve dans ‘le pays catalan,’ il ne me semble pas très catalan tout le temps : le 99% des personnes que j’ai rencontrées sont des Français qui parlent français et qui s’identifient comme Français, mais beaucoup d’entre eux parlent catalan comme deuxième langue. Tout ce qui me souvient que c’est le pays catalan, ce n’est que des drapeaux catalans sur les bâtiments officiels en ville.
De plus, lorsque je suis allée à Gérone, qui ne se situe que 40 minutes en train de Perpignan, cela m’est devenu encore plus évident. Gérone se trouve au cœur de la Catalogne : il y a des drapeaux catalans qui pèsent sur tous les balcons des appartements, dans les rues, bon, partout. Les cartes dans les restaurants sont écrites en catalan, et même les boutiquiers vous adressent tout d’abord en catalan et pas l’espagnol. Donc, il est très évident que c’est le territoire catalan.

Le festival à Perpignan le samedi dernier, c’était la première fois que j’ai eu l’impression que Perpignan est vraiment dans le pays catalan aussi. Il était premièrement, un festival pour promouvoir la région, mais a souligné également qu’il s’agit d’une région catalane (c’était dans le titre aussi !). Il y avait beaucoup de monde espagnol/catalan qui est venu pour visiter Perpignan pour ce festival aussi, pour voir que Perpignan s’inclut dans l’identité catalane. De plus, c’était la première fois que j’ai entendu les gens autour de moi parler en catalan à Perpignan.
Ce qui m’a plu le plus de ce festival, c’était qu’il est également la bienvenue à tous les nouveaux arrivants, pour nous inviter à profiter de la région. Le conseil général a évidemment investi beaucoup d’argent dans ce festival d’accueil et c’est toujours bon de savoir que l’on est le bienvenu ! Cette journée-là était formidable aussi, parce que je n’ai que dépensé 2€ en totale (pour le bus !).

Un de mes villes préférées que j’ai visité jusqu’ici, c’est Villefranche-de-Conflent, qui se classe parmi les plus beaux villages de France (c’est officiel, il y a un site web [1]). Malgré sa petite taille, Villefranche est riche en histoire, parce qu’elle est un village fortifié qui était très important tout au long de l’histoire, car Roussillon était un territoire contesté entre les Français et les Espagnols. J’y suis allée avec deux colocataires, et ensemble on a visité les grottes naturelles à proximité du village, et on a exploré les remparts du village. Avant de retourner à Perpignan, on est allée dans une pâtisserie, c’était alors la première fois que j’ai mangé des rousquilles. La rousquille est une spécialité traditionnelle catalane en Languedoc-Roussillon, mais aussi sur l’autre côté de la frontière franco-espagnole. C’est un biscuit rond et tendre, en forme de couronne et elle est saupoudrée de sucre glacé. Depuis lors, je dois avouer qu’aucune rousquille ne dépasse ceux que j’ai mangés à Villefranche!

Villefranche

Villefranche-de-Conflent

La semaine dernière, j’ai lu la chantefable, Aucassin et Nicolette. Il s’agit d’une histoire écrit au 13 siècle, et c’est la seule exemplaire de ce genre. La ‘chantefable’, mélange le récit et la poésie, la réalité et la fantaisie. L’histoire m’a plu beaucoup, mais ce qui est dommage, c’est que le livre n’a que 80 pages et la fin termine très brusquement. Il aurait été préférable de prolonger le récit et donner une description plus détaillée, mais il est de toute façon une belle narration. Ce qui était intéressant, c’était la façon dont chaque chapitre a changé entre poésie et prose. Le livre est bilingue et fournit le texte original en ancien français sur la gauche, puis le français comme on le connait aujourd’hui sur la droite. C’était intéressant de jeter un coup d’œil sur le texte original afin de voir ce qui ressemble la traduction, ce qui a changé ou ce que je pouvais déchiffrer.

En tant que vocabulaire, j’ai appris que l’on dit ‘une bourse’ dans cette région pour dire ‘sac.’ Une fois au supermarché, je me sentais que c’était un peu étrange quand la personne à la caisse m’a demandé si j’avais ‘une bourse.’ Je pensais qu’il posait des questions sur ma situation financière à l’université… Pourtant, quand j’y vais maintenant et j’oublie un sac, je connais le mot juste à paraître comme une vrai locale (je l’ai fait hier!). Pendant des cours de version espagnol, j’ai appris les mots : ‘pleurnichard,’ ‘geignard,’ ‘douillet,’ ‘désarroi,’ ‘de surcroît,’ ‘bigoudis,’ et ‘aléas.’ Ce ne sont pas des mots que j’utiliserais souvent dans la conversation, mais de toute façon, très utile s’ils se posent dans mon examen de version espagnole en Janvier… trop hâte.

Ce week-end, je vais aller à Nîmes avec Kam, pour voir un concert de musique d’Émilie Simon et visiter la ville pour la première fois, mais je vais vous en parler la prochaine fois.

À bientôt,

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A Busy Week in the Pyrénées-Orientales!

This week has been particuarly busy and I have managed to see and do many things in such a short space of time: Montpellier, La Forteresse de Salses, Catalan festival in Perpignan, Le Prieuré de Serrabonne and Le Lac de la Raho among other things!

As I said in my last blog post, I went to Montpellier on Wednesday evening for a soirée parrainage (an Erasmus mentor/mentee evening). It was a lovely evening, and I got to walk around Montpellier briefly on the way from the bus to the location where the event was held and see the busy city life and the beautiful old buildings everywhere. However, it took two and a half hours each way to drive there from Perpignan. So we actually spent more time in the bus than actually at the event. What was a shame, was that I didn’t actually speak to anyone from other universities, no one seemed very interested to talk to other people, but I spoke to a lot of the parrains/marraines (mentors) and other Erasmus students from Perpignan who I had come with on the bus. I definately want to go back to Montpellier some time for a day trip so I can spend more time there and actually go shopping or visit places of interest.

Thursday, I managed to read a book, Aucassin et Nicolette in about an hour. It is very short (80 pages) but tells a romantic story of two young lovers who want to be together, yet many things such as storms, family and war get in their way. It was written in the 13th century and is the only known surviving book written as something called a chantefable (this is a genre which alternates between sung verse and recited prose, reality and fantasy. The word is from the Old French cantefable which literally says “(it) sings (and it) narrates.” I quite liked this as it changed things up a bit when reading. I read the bilangue version which gave the original story in Old French on the left-hand page and Standard French on the right-hand page. It was interesting to have a look at the Old French version from time to time and to compare how much the language has evolved over time yet still somehow resembles what French is today. I do recommend French-learners and speakers to read this story if you haven’t yet, it is not difficult to follow and is a beautiful story. My only criticism is that it is very short – the author could have expanded the story so much more and the ending could have been less abrupt.

As classes finish early on Friday’s, my housemates Kam, Ingeborg and I went to La Forteresse de Salses during the afternoon. It is a medieval fortress about 20 minutes outside of Perpignan on the 1€ bus. Entry is also free for European citizens under 25, so the entire aftenroon only cost us our bus journey! When we arrived, the lady at the Information Desk informed up that there would be a free guided tour in French in 10 minutes which would give us access to parts of the fortress which people cannot access without a guide. The guide was very informative and told us just how unique the fortress is compared to others of its time. It is the only fortress of its kind that can be found in Europe. It’s defense stratergies are also different because  it is not located on a hill but instead, in a dip. There are many fireplaces all around the fortress; their primary function is to provide constant air flow in the rooms and corridors, so the air is never stuffy, secondly to communicate between different floors! We even learnt that the soldiers and officals stationed in the fortress never slept lying down because that represented death – instead they always slept sitting up (this cannot have been comfortable!!). The fortress was definately worth the visit, and the free tour made it even more enjoyable. It doesn’t require a lot of time to visit either: we got the bus from Perpignan at 14:05 and we were ready to get back at 16:30.

Forteresse de Salses

Forteresse de Salses

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Biggest fireplace in the Forteresse de Salses

Biggest fireplace in the Forteresse de Salses

La Forteresse de Salses

La Forteresse de Salses

Saturday morning, Kam and I got up early to go to the ‘Journée d’accueil pour des Nouveaux Catalans,’ a festival at the Palais des rois de Majorque in town for 10am. I was not sure what the festival would be like but it turned out to be a great decision to go! We arrived and there were already many people waiting to get in. There were many exhibitors giving information about their businesses and services that are available in the region. The best things were the free things: we were offered a free bottle of wine, free post cards, free food and drink, but the best thing was the possibility to go on a free excursion in the afternoon (return bus and entry). We decided to sign up to go on the bus heading to Le Prieuré de Serrabonne. This is a small priory situated in the mountains, an hour and a half from Perpignan. We knew it was very difficult to get there on public transport so it seemed like a good plan!

We still had several hours until our bus left, at 2pm, so we were able to walk leisurely around the exhibites in the Palais. As we had not visited the Palais before, it was also a good opportunity to walk around and make the most of it. It is a really beautiful place, and it was a great decision for the festival to be located here, as it mixed a cultural festival with a great historical location in Perpignan, which gave us a lot to see and do.

My favourite places in the Palais were the rooftop, where you can see Perpignan and the mountains, and also the chapel which boasts a beautiful starry blue ceiling and lovely stained-glass windows.

The festival attracted many people from Perpignan, the region and even many people from Spain. It was interesting to see the Catalan aspect to Perpignan because although we are in ‘French Catalonia,’ up until now, it hasn’t really felt that Catalan to me. It’s great how the local council organised the event to welcome old and new people to the region and promote businesses, services and places of interest in the P.O (Pyrénées-Orientales).

View from the rooftop - Le Palais des rois de Majorque

View from the rooftop – Le Palais des rois de Majorque

Le Palais des rois de Majorque

Le Palais des rois de Majorque

In the chapel, stained-glass window reflextions!

In the chapel, stained-glass window reflextions!

Me, carrying all my freebies (it felt like Fresher's Fair in Sheffield!

Me, carrying all my freebies (it felt like Fresher’s Fair in Sheffield!

A few of the exhibit tents in the Palais des rois de Majorque gardens

A few of the exhibit tents in the Palais des rois de Majorque gardens

Le Prieuré de Serrabonne is very small – we were given an hour and a half to spend there which was more than sufficient. Although it is very small, it is in a beautiful location in the mountains, and it was just simply the best to take a seat and take in the fantastic views around us. My favourite room in the priory was by far the cloisture, which boasts some of the most beautifully carved pillars I have ever seen, which even has the most incredible scenery in the background. I would happily sit there and stare into the distance for hours without complaint; the natural setting was completely unspoilt and breathtaking. This then lead to an indoor cloister which houses pink marble decorations but this does feel quite out-of-pace in such a stark and simple building of grey stone. There were also some gardens which were nice to walk around, but I was very tired by this point in the day and did not venture too far. This is a beautiful place to visit and would highly recommend, it is just a shame it is so difficult to get to without a car!

Just look at this view!!!  La Prieuré de Serrabonne

Just look at this view!!! Le Prieuré de Serrabonne

Me in the cloister at La Prieuré de Serrabonne

Me in the cloister at Le Prieuré de Serrabonne

We managed to get home by 18:30 and finished the night off with a pizza and film night with a few housemates and went to a Cuban bar which ressembled a lot like Revolucion de Cuba in Sheffield to me (that I love!).

Sunday, after a long lie in and a quick Skype with my mum (which didn’t really last long as my wifi here is not the best), Mattieu invited Kam and I during the afternoon to visit Le Lac de la Raho, a lake next to the village where he grew up, and which boasts amazing views of the mountains all the way around. It took about an hour and a half to walk all the way around and it was a bit windy, but it was great to stretch our legs and get some fresh air! It is one of the seven best natural sites in the region too, but it is not easily possible to access it by public transport.

Kam and I at Le Lac de la Raho, it was a bit windy!!

Kam and I at Le Lac de la Raho, it was a bit windy!!

Le Lac de la Raho

Le Lac de la Raho

Le Lac de la Raho

Le Lac de la Raho

So that was what happened this week! Now time to relax this evening before classes start again tomorrow. I have a meeting on Wednesday evening about the Erasmus French classes – it is Week 5 but these classes have not yet started which is a bit strange! Next Friday-Sunday, I am going to Nîmes to visit the town and see Émilé Simon (a French singer) in concert 🙂

Bonne semaine!

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Just popping over to Spain for the day: Girona!

Making the most of living close to the French-Spanish border, like promised I went to Spain on a day trip last weekend with Kamilla and Julia.

Girona is a mere 40-minute train journey from Perpignan, or about an hour in the car. It is quite pricey to get the train though; it may only be a short journey, yet it costs 20€ one way (aller simple)! The train line is run by RENFE, the Spanish network, and so my French carte jeune or Young Person Railcard, is invalid on these trains (this sucks for discounts to Barcelona!). I should consider a tareja joven (a Spanish railcard) at this rate before I even go to Salamanca!  In order to ease up transport costs, we organsied a covoiturage (for 8€!!) for the way home in the evening, with a young French couple from Montpellier on their way home from a holiday in Spain. A bit of French practice after a day practising some Spanish in Spain!

Perpignan - Girona on Google maps

Perpignan – Girona on Google maps

Girona itself is beautiful and there were so many great photo opportunities. We shared tapas at lunch, appreciated the views of the colourful buildings from the various bridges in the city centre, explored the ruins of the ancient city walls and last but not least, made the most of the shopping opportunitues, something a bit lacking here in Perpignan (of course, after siesta had finished!).

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Discovering Girona

Despite Perpignan (Catalan: Perpinyá) being located in North Catalonia, where I have spotted Catalan flags flying high in the city centre streets and where road signs are written in both French and Catalan, I do feel like I am still in France. I was partially concerned before I left the UK that everyone would speak Catalan here and that I would struggle to get by in not knowing this language, yet Perpignan is very much a French city in my eyes. Yes, I see Catalan flags and yes I see Catalan road signs, but 99% of the people I have met here are French, speak French and identify as French.

Catalan flags in Perpignan city centre

Catalan flags in Perpignan city centre

Yet, Girona, only 40 minutes away by train, is a city that is in a completely different situation and in the heart of Catalunya. Most apartment balconies proudly display their own Catalan flags, the menus outside restaurants are all written in Catalan and even more, when I go to a clothes shop, the assistants spoke to me in Catalan before I switched the language to Spanish (the first time I have heard Catalan spoken since moving here). It’s incredible just how different the Catalan vibe is in Girona to Perpignan.

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‘Catalans want to vote’ (in relation to the Scottish Referendum)

The funniest thing was when I interacted with the waitress at the restaurant and the clothes shop assistants, as they all spoke some French to me. It was quite nice for people to assume this, instead of switching to English for a change. I don’t think ‘Merci, au revoir’ is Catalan at any rate.

I am going to Villefranche-de-Conflent tomorrow (one of the top things to do in this region according to my guidebook) with some friends, by taking the bus for 1€. It is an hour and a half from Perpignan and located in the mountains.

For now, let’s just appreciate some photos of beautiful Girona. Me encanta 🙂

Have you visited Girona or another part of Catalunya ?

Robyn

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Julia, Me, Kam

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