Egypt Travel

Nile Cruise Day 2: Valley of the Kings, Queens and Hatshepsut’s Temple

Day 2 was the most tiring day, with a grueling 5am alarm . Despite the early start, really we were eternally grateful later in the day, when the temperature started to become unbearable. There is a reason why they do this to us!

The Valley of the Kings is the most impressive stop, so it felt like we had peaked at the start of the day, but you want to get it done early before all the other tour groups arrive.

You buy tickets which will let you in to only 3 of the 9 tombs currently open in the valley. Our guide chose the ones on the list that were most well preserved with the best wall decorations still intact: Rameses III, IV and IX. Rameses II which is closed, is the most damaged- his tomb was broken into the most in antiquity as he was so wealthy and left a great legacy.

For an extra charge you can get permission to take photos in the valley (read: inside the tombs AND outside). It was 300LE (£12) which is ridiculous. But don’t try to get away with it, every time someone took a picture or had a phone/camera out, they were challenged by the guards.

I decided instead to pay a little extra to see Tutankhkamun’s tomb. It’s incredible how well hidden it was as it is so close to many other tombs. It happened to be hidden underneath another tomb so is the only one so far to have not been raided in antiquity. You can see many of the incredible belongings of the boy king in Cairo’s Egyptian Museum which are beautiful. Considering the tomb was so small, and he died so young at 19, one can only imagine how incredible the original contents of the tombs of older, more famous kings which have diappeared…  There are a lot of other unfound tombs still, so maybe it is only a matter of time until we find more?

His tomb is the smallest and least impressive artistically (it was originally made for a high priest, not a king, but changed at last minute after his sudden death), but just for the historical value it is worth seeing. J. wasn’t fussed but I would have been sorely disappointed had I not gone. Inside his tomb, you can still see his mummy (absolutely tiny!) and part of the sarcophagus is still inside. The body is in a terrible condition as Howard Carter tried to cut it into three pieces to move it (oh why…)

After this highlight, we went to the Valley of the Queens. The tombs here are smaller and don’t have much of a wow-factor after visiting the Kings’ tombs but still worth seeing. For 1000LE (£40!), you can pay for entry for a measly 10 minutes to Nefertari’s tomb – arguably the most beautiful and intact. However the cost is crazy! I just looked it up online…

Before visiting Hatshepsut’s Temple, we went to the Artisan Village nearby. Obviously a tourist stop along the way, but it was an interesting stop. We got to see how the locals use the original techniques with the same type of tools to make handicrafts like vases and pots out of local stones like alabaster. We did a fair bit of haggling and got the price of a handmade white alabaster vase and two smaller blue onyx vases together from 4600LE to 2100LE (£80~). It was a bit of money but they are absolutely beautiful and I will keep them forever as a memory of this trip.

Hatshepsut, the female Pharoah, has an interesting history and so does her temple which was partially destroyed by her stepson, Tutmosis III. However it has been laboriously restored in recent years and is stunning. By this point in the day it was boiling and there was no shade.

IMG_4175

After a short journey back to the boat, we got to enjoy lunch and relax by the pool all afternoon before a ‘cocktail party’ and à la carte dinner while the boat sailed south down to Edfu.

The entertainment this afternoon was having locals trying to sell their wares on little rowing boats which they tied to our big boat and the Italians on board bartering for what seemed like forever for an overpriced tablecloth. The whole situation was ridiculous and funny but after 45 minutes, the sellers were getting annoyed and the incessant hassling was wearing thin.

Buy my stuff!

After a dressy dinner, they put on Death on the Nile in the bar area. It was my favourite version but I was shattered and had seen it so many times before. I should watch it again so I can point out all the places I have been to and how different they looked in the 1960s!

Day 3 would be a more relaxing day which was welcome.

3 comments

      1. Yes thank you 🙂 I just checked ours too and they are included, but good to know about Tutankhamen’s tomb though! something we will decide on soon!

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